Glycation (A.G.E.)

Glycation-card

fact1

1 in 2 people are genetically predisposed to reduced genetic protection against Glycation.

If you’re like most people, then no one has ever told you about glycation. Affecting Collagen and Elastin fibers, glycation is now well recognised to be a leading cause of accelerated skin aging.

glycation

Keeping the skin firm, plump and wrinkle-free, collagen is the principal structural protein of the skin. Like many components of the body, collagen undergoes continuous turnover, being produced and recycled on an ongoing basis throughout your life. When you are younger, your body makes more collagen than it loses, but after about the age of 40, collagen loss can accelerate, leading to a decline in the health and appearance of your skin.

Our genetic predispositions play a big role in determining both the speed of collagen production and breakdown. Key variations in this genetic category can identify if the rise and fall of collagen is in balance, or if the breakdown of collagen predominates, which can result in the appearance of premature wrinkling, aging and sagging of the skin.

Genetic Markers SkinDNA ™ Test for in this category.

Gene Table

SkinDNA™ Gene Descriptor Genotype Description
s400976/
Glycation Interruption
AA Responsible for controlling serum glucose levels, energy intake and release. While glucose is a vital cellular fuel, if not fully metabolised Glycation can occur.
Chromosome Location: 1q31

Develop a better understanding about SkinDNA ™ Genetic Test: Glycation (A.G.E.) category.

Background Science

Glycation has been described as carmelization of the skin from the inside out. The skin-damaging effects of glycation cause wrinkles, dryness (eczema), skin laxity, as well as acne and rosacea.

Advanced Glycation End Products (A.G.Es) are the end result of a glucose-driven process known as Glycation. Glycation occurs when excess bodily glucose molecules link to the skin’s Collagen and Elastin fibers. This cross-linking can form chemical bridges between these proteins. Glycated fibers can become rigid, less elastic and have reduced regenerative ability, which can lead to damage such as laxity, cracking and thinning skin.

glycation-skin1In young skin, the Dermal Epidermal Junction has the appearance of a mountain range that helps anchor the Epidermis to the Dermis, forming a network of supportive Collagen fibers.

glycation-skin2As your skin ages these supportive fibers—which are responsible for the appearance and texture of your skin—lose their supportive network as a result of glycation.

The genes that make up your Wrinkling (A.G.E.) score play a key role in skin Glycation. They are responsible for controlling serum glucose levels, energy intake and energy release. Having variations in these genes can alter the functioning of normal glucose levels and energy metabolism. While glucose is a vital cellular fuel, if not completely metabolised by the body Glycation can occur, leading way to wrinkling, dryness and laxity.

Don’t know all of these terms? Our glossary may help…

Glossary

Collagen
Collagen is the principal structural protein that holds the skin together.
Collagen is just one of thousands of different proteins in the body. The most abundant protein is collagen. In fact, collagen makes up more than one third of all protein in the body and about 75% of the skin.

Elastin
Elastin is a protein found in connective tissue that is elastic. In the skin, Elastin helps keep flexibility by providing a bounce-back reaction if skin is pulled or pinched.
Enough elastin in the skin means that the skin will return to its normal shape after a pull or a pinch. It also helps keep skin smooth as it stretches to accommodate normal activities like flexing a muscle or opening and closing the mouth to talk or eat.

Glucose
Glucose is the body’s prime source of fuel for generating energy. It is a type of sugar that comes from digesting carbohydrates into a chemical that we can easily convert to energy.
But glucose has its dark side. If not properly metabolised Glucose can bind tightly to proteins and form abnormal chemical bridges that progressively damage tissue elasticity. This process is referred to as Glycation.

Glycation
Glycation occurs when excess bodily glucose molecules link to the skin’s Collagen and Elastin fibers.
This cross-linking can form chemical bridges between these proteins. Glycated fibers can become rigid, less elastic and have reduced regenerative ability, which can lead to damage such as laxity, cracking and thinning skin.